Tuesday, January 20, 2015

Covering the Rudder Assembly (LD) (Video)





27-41 (Covering the Rudder Assembly LD) 

A Time Lapse look at the covering of the rudder assembly with polyfiber 1.8 oz glider cloth.








Saturday, January 17, 2015

(27-41-00) Rudder Assembly (LD) (Video)






 (27-41-00) Rudder Assembly (LD) 

In this episode of building the EMG_6 We assemble the Rudder Assembly for the Low Drag Rudder.

Thursday, January 15, 2015

Rudder Spar Sub Assembly (Video)





 (27-41-00-10) Rudder Spar Sub Assembly 

In this episode of building the EMG_6 We assemble the Rudder Spar Sub Assembly for the Low Drag Rudder assembly.



Thursday, January 1, 2015

Towing Options for the EMG-6

Towing



One of the concepts that the EMG-6 design was based on was the ability to tow the aircraft aloft using a variety of different type of vehicles. Not only for primary training but also as a supplement to battery power. The ability to tow the aircraft aloft using a variety of different type of vehicles provides for low-cost options that will get the pilot in the air sooner. Although the aircraft is designed to be a self launching glider utilizing electric motors for its primary source of power, the platform was designed around the idea of having many different missions. One of the missions for the aircraft will be a pure glider. Another will be a glider with a sustainer motor, and then most of the other configurations will be multiple combinations of different electric power plant systems as they develop.

Tow Options


We've already completed the tow testing utilizing a 400 cc Honda quad runner. It appears that the speed may be the limiting factor for a four Wheeler. In windy conditions up to 15 mph the four Wheeler would tow just fine in third gear. However in no-wind conditions we typically tow at about 40 mph. Which was about the limit for the Honda in fifth gear. There was one more gear available which was not tested. Typically we could start out the tow run in fifth gear and simply power right on up to tow speed.

"Mater" The nickname for the jeep that we bought for the purpose of towing. Although this is only a four-cylinder vehicle it has way more power and speed than we could ever hope to use for the purpose of towing. We are modifying this vehicle for several different tests that we wish to conduct. We bought this at auction for $200. And we now have many tows utilizing this vehicle.



Corning Airport Information

FAA INFORMATION EFFECTIVE 25 JUNE 2015


Location

FAA Identifier: 0O4
Lat/Long: 39-56-46.0000N / 122-10-16.0000W
39-56.766667N / 122-10.266667W
39.9461111 / -122.1711111
(estimated)
Elevation: 295.6 ft. / 90.1 m (surveyed)
Variation: 17E (1985)
From city: 1 mile NE of CORNING, CA
Time zone: UTC -7 (UTC -8 during Standard Time)
Zip code: 96021

Airport Operations

Airport use: Open to the public
Activation date: 04/1940
Sectional chart: SAN FRANCISCO
Control tower: no
ARTCC: OAKLAND CENTER
FSS: RANCHO MURIETA FLIGHT SERVICE STATION
NOTAMs facility: RIU (NOTAM-D service available)
Attendance: 0800-1700
FBO ON ARPT PHONE 530-824-0644.
Pattern altitude: 1295.6 ft. MSL
Wind indicator: lighted
Segmented circle: yes
Lights: ACTVT MIRL RY 17/35 - CTAF.
Beacon: white-green (lighted land airport)
Operates sunset to sunrise.


Contact Us

Contact Us

Rainbow Aviation Services
Adventure Aircraft

930 N Marguerite Ave
Corning, California 96021

Tel:   530-824-0644
Fax:   530-824-0250

mail: info@electricmotorglider.com










Rules For Flying The EMG-6

Rules For Flying The EMG-6

We constantly are reminded by other pilots and would be pilots that all of the costs associated with flying simply make it intangible. The cost to build or purchase an aircraft, the cost of aircraft rental, the cost of flight training, the difficulty associated with actually obtaining and maintaining a pilot certificate, the recurrent training requirements, annual inspections, cost of insurance, cost of aircraft storage, and the cost of fuel.

One of the more creative aspects of this whole project was the designing the aircraft to to take advantage of the positive aspect of all of the current Federal Aviation Regulations.
By building an aircraft to take advantage of these regulations we can significantly reduce the economic impact on its operator.

NO.... Multi-engine rating required.

FAA regulations do not require a pilot to possess a multi engine rating when flying a single place experimental aircraft. Recently we have been nailing down the regulations that apply to gliders and the FAA has concurred that there are no regulations requiring the possession of a multi-engine rating to fly a multi-engine glider even when used in the carriage of a passenger.


NO.... Glider Rating required.

FAA regulations do not require the pilot of a single place experimental aircraft to possess a glider rating unless for the purpose of carrying passengers. Additionally a glider pilot with only a glider rating may carry passengers and fly the aircraft in a single or multi-engine configuration.



NO.... Medical required.

Because this aircraft possesses the characteristics and meets the definition of a glider (power glider) the aircraft does not require a medical certificate for its operation. As a Private Pilot, Recreational Pilot, Sport Pilot, Student Pilot or Ultralight Pilot.




Private Pilot.

A private pilot may fly this aircraft as a single place experimental aircraft with no additional ratings required Additionally as this aircraft meets the definition of a glider (powered glider) the private pilot need not possess a medical certificate for its operation.




Glider Pilot.

A glider pilot may fly this aircraft with no additional ratings required. This aircraft meets the definition of a glider (powered glider). additionally a glider pilot my operate this aircraft in the powered single or multi engine configuration. with reciprocating or electric engines.



Sport pilot.

This aircraft may be flown using a sport pilot certificate. This Aircraft will meet the definition of a light Sport Aircraft when operated as a glider. The aircraft may also be flown as a light sport aircraft utilizing one reciprocating engine mounted on the rear of the aircraft. Currently the regulations do not allow the use of electric motors, however these regulations are in the process of being updated. The ASTM committees have approved the standards and we are currently waiting for the FAA to approve the regulations that will allow the use of Electric or other power plants.

Student pilot.

A student pilot may legally fly this aircraft. The holder of a student pilot certificate may legally fly this aircraft however it requires a logbook endorsement from a certified flight instructor. The aircraft is intended to be configured as eirthe a sing place aircraft or two place aircraft and as such a student pilot could be signed off to solo this aircraft, build flight time and even take his check ride for his glider certificate in this aircraft either in the powered or unpowered configuration.

Ultralight Pilot.

This aircraft may be flown under FAA part 103 regulations as an ultralight aircraft. Under part 103 no pilot certificate or other requirements including training are required to fly this aircraft. However we believe that flying any aircraft without proper flight training is a recipe for disaster. Additionally an ultralight pilot may construct this aircraft and fly it as a true legal ultralight and then later on decide to license the aircraft as an experimental aircraft and continue on to get his Sport pilot, Recreational Pilot, or Private pilot, glider Certificate in the same aircraft.


AC 103-7 Advisory Circular (Part 103 Ultralights)


AC 103-7 Advisory Circular (Part 103 Ultralights)



U.S. Department of Transportation
Federal Aviation Administration

Subject: THE ULTRALIGHT VEHICLE Date: 1/30/84 AC No: AC 103-7
Initiated by: AF0-820

1. PURPOSE. This advisory circular provides guidance to the operators of
ultralights in the United States. It discusses the elements which make up the
definition of ultralight vehicles for the purposes of operating under Federal
Aviation Regulation (FAR) Part 103, It also discusses when an ultralight must be
operated as an aircraft under the regulations applicable to certificated
aircraft.

PREAMBLE Part 103-Ultralight Vehicles Operating Requirements

Link to FAR Part 103 Regulations


Preamble 

Part 103-Ultralight Vehicles

Operating Requirements

Adopted: July 30,1982 Effective: October 4,1982 (Published in 47 FR 38770, September 2,1982)
SUMMARY: This amendment establishes rules governing the operation of ultralight vehicles in the United States. The rule defines ultralight vehicles in two categories: powered and unpowered. To be considered an ultralight vehicle, a hang glider must weigh less than 155 pounds; while a powered vehicle must weigh less than 254 pounds; is limited to 5 U.S. gallons of fuel; must have a maximum speed of not more than 55 knots; and must have a poweroff stall speed of no more than 24 knots. Both powered and unpowered ultralight vehicles are limited to a single occupant. Those vehicles which exceed the above criteria will be considered aircraft for purposes of airworthiness certification and registration, and their operators will be subject to the same certification requirements as are aircraft operators. These rules for ultralight vehicles are needed to achieve an acceptable level of air safety by reducing potential conflict with other airspace users and to provide protection to persons and property on the ground.


CFR 14 PART 103-ULTRALIGHT VEHICLES (Regulations)

CFR 14  PART 103-ULTRALIGHT VEHICLES (Regulations)

Contained in this section are the actual regulations that govern the operation of ultralight vehicles.
Although the preamble and the advisory circular is often used to interpret what the intent of the rule was, these are the regulations as they stand for an ultralight vehicle. And as such these ultralight vehicles are not considered aircraft. These rules stand separately from the rules that apply to aircraft.

 PART 103-ULTRALIGHT VEHICLES

Subpart A-General

103.1 Applicability.103.3 Inspection requirements.
103.5 Waivers.
103.7 Certification and registration.

Subpart B-Operating Rules

103.9 Hazardous operations.
103.11 Daylight operations.
103.13 Operation near aircraft; right-of-way rules.
103.15 Operations over congested areas.
103.17 Operations in certain airspace.
103.19 Operations in prohibited or restricted areas.
103.20 Flight Restrictions in the Proximity of Certain Areas Designated by Notice to Airmen.
103.21 Visual reference with the surface.
103.23 Flight visibility and cloud clearance requirements.
Authority: Secs. 307, 313(a), 601(a), 602, and 603, Federal Aviation Act of1958 (49 U.S.C. 1348, 1354(a), 1421(a), 1422, and 1423); sec. 6(c), Department of Transportation Act (49 U.S.C. 1655(c). Source: Docket No. 21631, 47 FR 38776, Sept. 2, 1982, unless otherwise noted.

Subpart A-General

103.1 Applicability

This part prescribes rules governing the operation of ultralight vehicles in the United States. For the purposes of this part, an ultralight vehicle is a vehicle that:
(a) Is used or intended to be used for manned operation in the air by a single occupant;
(b) Is used or intended to be used for recreation or sport purposes only;
(c) Does not have any U.S. or foreign airworthiness certificate; and
(d) If unpowered, weighs less than 155 pounds; or
(e) If powered:
(1) Weighs less than 254 pounds empty weight, excluding floats and safety devices which are intended for deployment in a potentially catastrophic situation;
(2) Has a fuel capacity not exceeding 5 U.S. gallons;
(3) Is not capable of more than 55 knots calibrated airspeed at full power in level flight; and
(4) Has a power-off stall speed which does not exceed 24 knots calibrated airspeed.

103.3 Inspection requirements.

(a) Any person operating an ultralight vehicle under this part shall, upon request, allow the Administrator, or his designee, to inspect the vehicle to determine the applicability of this part.
(b) The pilot or operator of an ultralight vehicle must, upon request of the Administrator, furnish satisfactory evidence that the vehicle is subject only to the provisions of this part.

103.5 Waivers.

No person may conduct operations that require a deviation from this part except under a written waiver issued by the Administrator.

103.7 Certification and registration.

(a) Notwithstanding any other section pertaining to certification of aircraft or their parts or equipment, ultralight vehicles and their component parts and equipment are not required to meet the airworthiness certification standards specified for aircraft or to have certificates of airworthiness.
(b) Notwithstanding any other section pertaining to airman certification, operators of ultralight vehicles are not required to meet any aeronautical knowledge, age, or experience requirements to operate those vehicles or to have airman or medical certificates.
(c) Notwithstanding any other section pertaining to registration and marking of aircraft, ultralight vehicles are not required to be registered or to bear markings of any type.

Subpart B-Operating Rules

103.9 Hazardous operations.

(a) No person may operate any ultralight vehicle in a manner that creates a hazard to other persons or property.
(b) No person may allow an object to be dropped from an ultralight vehicle if such action creates a hazard to other persons or property.

103.11 Daylight operations.

(a) No person may operate an ultralight vehicle except between the hours of sunrise and sunset.
(b) Notwithstanding paragraph (a) of this section, ultralight vehicles may be operated during the twilight periods 30 minutes before official sunrise and 30 minutes after official sunset or, in Alaska, during the period of civil twilight as defined in the Air Almanac, if:
(1) The vehicle is equipped with an operating anticollision light visible for at least 3 statute miles; and
(2) All operations are conducted in uncontrolled airspace.

103.13 Operation near aircraft; right-of-way rules.

(a) Each person operating an ultralight vehicle shall maintain vigilance so as to see and avoid aircraft and shall yield the right-of-way to all aircraft.
(b) No person may operate an ultralight vehicle in a manner that creates a collision hazard with respect to any aircraft.
(c) Powered ultralights shall yield the right-of-way to unpowered ultralights.

103.15 Operations over congested areas.

No person may operate an ultralight vehicle over any congested area of a city, town, or settlement, or over any open air assembly of persons.

103.17 Operations in certain airspace.

No person may operate an ultralight vehicle within Class A, Class B, Class C, or Class D airspace or within the lateral boundaries of the surface area of Class E airspace designated for an airport unless that person has prior authorization from the ATC facility having jurisdiction over that airspace.

103.19 Operations in prohibited or restricted areas.

No person may operate an ultralight vehicle in prohibited or restricted areas unless that person has permission from the using or controlling agency, as appropriate.

103.20 Flight Restrictions in the Proximity of Certain Areas Designated by Notice to Airmen.

No person may operate an ultralight vehicle in areas designated in a Notice to Airmen under 91.141 or 91.143 of this chapter, unless authorized by ATC.

    Notice: Effective October 11, 2001, 103.20 is amended as follows (per Federal Register page 66 FR 47378): No person may operate an ultralight vehicle in areas designated in a Notice to Airmen under § 91.137, § 91.138, § 91.141, § 91.143 or § 91.145 of this chapter, unless authorized by:
      (a) Air Traffic Control (ATC); or
      (b) A Flight Standards Certificate of Waiver or Authorization issued for the demonstration or event.

103.21 Visual reference with the surface.

No person may operate an ultralight vehicle except by visual reference with the surface.

103.23 Flight visibility and cloud clearance requirements.

No person may operate an ultralight vehicle when the flight visibility or distance from clouds is less than that in the table found below. All operations in Class A, Class B, Class C, and Class D airspace or Class E airspace designated for an airport must receive prior ATC authorization as required in 103.17 of this part.


Building the EMG-6 aircraft under FAR Part 103.

Back to Roots-  Building the EMG-6 aircraft under FAR Part 103.


The EMG-6 was designed to meet both the spirit and the letter of FAR Part 103 for true ultralights
The EMG-6 comes in under the strict 254 pound weight limit.

The appeal of Part 103 operations is that no registration is required for the aircraft and neither license nor medical is required for the pilot.

Referred to the following sections on this page:
The regulations, Part 103 (the regulation that governs the operation of ultralight aircraft.)
The preamble to Part 103 Ultralight  Regulations
The FAA advisory circular (which spells out the particulars in implementing and policing ultralight aircraft.)
The Federal Aviation Regulation that regulates ultralight flying is called Part 103. These are the legal rules we fly by.
Part 103 defines an ultralight as:
  • 1-seat
  • Less than 254 pounds max. empty weight (powered)
  • 155 pounds max empty weight (unpowered)
  • 5 gallons max. fuel capacity
  • 55 knots max. full power speed
  • 24 knots max power off stall speed
In the past years have ultralight aircraft accounted for a significant percentage of the civilian-owned aircraft in the US. In fact, it was out of the ultralight industry that the light sport industry was actually born. However with the advent of light sport aircraft industry, we have seen a significant impediment to affordable flight. The costs associated with building new aircraft, registering, maintaining, and obtaining a pilot certificate are still substantial enough that in today's economy limiting the opportunity to take advantage of the wonders of flight simply.
We believe that ultralight aircraft can be built, maintained, and flown in the same professional manner that other aircraft are. However cost remains an ever present impediment for most people. As technology changes, new opportunities are making it possible for an even greater number of individuals to enjoy and share the pleasures of aviation; not only building their own aircraft, but flying it as well.
Among all of the segments in aviation today, none is easier to get into, cheaper to start, and offers more potential for reward than ultralights. It is, in our opinion, as good as it gets. Ultralight flying is an experience like no other. Whether they fly out of their local airport or their own backyard, ultralight pilots today enjoy the most exhilarating of flight experiences, with, possibly, more benefits than any other segment of aviation.
Take a look at these advantages:
• You are not required to have a pilot’s license or a medical
• The aircraft doesn’t even have to be registered
• No required written or oral exams
• The cost to build is relatively low
• Low operating costs
• Simplicity of operation
• Short take off and landing distances
• Soft field capabilities
• Easy to transport
• Easy to store
• The ability to operate out of a short private runway
Flying in a Part 103 environment meets the needs for the vast majority of pilots. Whether this be hopping around the patch doing touch and goes, sightseeing, or just out seeking the challenges of flying a glider, just the sheer pleasure of being in the air .
Let's talk about some of the positive attributes of flying a part 103 aircraft and some of the challenges.
While flight training is required to hold a pilot certificate is not required to fly a part 103 aircraft.
There are no requirements mandated by the FAA for inspections or maintenance.
Part 103 aircraft are typically short field takeoff and landing aircraft. And are often flown out of one's own property or even stored in one's own garage.
There are no restrictions regarding construction. No requirements for you to build 51% of your own aircraft.
No registration requirements by the FAA.
There are restrictions on where part 103 aircraft can be flown, mostly they are intended to be flown in uncontrolled airspace.
All part 103 aircraft are single place aircraft.
Aircraft may not be flown at night. (Maybe flown one half hour after sunset if equipped with an anti-collision light.)

Referred to the following sections on this page:
The regulations, Part 103
The preamble to Part 103 Ultralight  Regulations
The FAA advisory circular (which spells out the particulars in implementing and policing ultralight aircraft.)

A Green Airplane

A Greener Airplane


Even if you're not completely on board with the whole concept of eco-friendly world,

The concept of a greener airplane is a no-brainer.

The cost of fuel continues to rise.

The supply of fuel continues to decrease.

At some point in time the transition will inevitably have to take place where we're using an alternative form of energy.

But even this is trivial to all the other reasons for our Green Airplane.
The ultralight industry thrived for many years. It made the magical world of flight available to a much larger spectrum of the population. The aircraft were simple, low-cost, and easy to operate. Anyone that was ever afforded a flight in ultralight aircraft, cruising out over the landscape at a mere 35 mph. Found it like riding on a magic carpet. A never forgotten sensation of freedom unsurpassed and unappreciated by anyone that has not had the opportunity.

In recent years The ultralight aircraft industry has taken a nose dive and today is left with only a few manufacturers continuing to produce legal ultralights. There are many aspects of the industry that have changed over the years that contributed to the downfall of the ultralight industry. Certainly the introduction of the light sport aircraft rule didn't so much destroyed the ultralight industry as much as recategorize most of the aircraft that had previously flown as ultralights. The real challenges to the ultralight industry have been other factors like noise,unreliability, safety, and cost.

 The noise factor. One aspect that created a poor reputation for the ultralight industry was the high power to weight ratio two-stroke engines required to power these aircraft. The concept of using an electric motor and reducing the noise level will completely change the perception from the general public about these aircraft. And you can understand why the general public would become annoyed with a two-stroke powered aircraft screaming in the background as it flew by at only 500 feet off the ground yet flying at a speed of 35 miles an hour, it would seem like the aircraft was there forever. The noise level of an electric aircraft at 500 feet would likely be undetectable.The pressure for airports located in metropolitan areas continues to mount with regards to noise acceptability. Airports are being forced to close, and most every airport located near a population density has noise abatement procedures for all aircraft. In the future we will see airports located in these high population density areas be revitalized if we can eliminate the noise issue. Everyone can see the advantages of reducing ground transportation congestion. The electric powered aircraft will probably be the saving grace for many of these airports.

The unreliability factor. The problem of reliability with the two-stroke engines have made our company Rainbow Aviation Services thrive over the years. Our light sport repairman classes continue to fill to this very day. The ability to make a two-stroke engine reliable was not particularly difficult however the amount of knowledge, background, reference material and experiance necessary to do so was beyond the reach of the average aviator. The reliability of the two-stroke engine was regegated into the category of "death trap" by the vast majority of pilots. The number of actual two-stroke engine failures still remains relatively high to this very day. We dream of the day when the majority of sport aviation pilots are flying electric powered aircraft. Not that there will not be hurdles to overcome but as one customer said "when was the last time the blower motor in your furnace went out" the whole concept of having a power plant with only one moving part could very easily rival the reliability that we now see on turbine engines today. Not only that, but without the heat, mess, pollution, cost, etc. An anticipated cost of an engine overhaul basically involves two bearings. That in itself is a paradigm shift beyond comprehension.
The growing fleet of electric powered aircraft in the world today shows the viability of this concept. And the evolution of electric powered aircraft is growing at an exponential rate while the growth and experimentation with petroleum-based power plants continues to diminish.

Because our EMG-6 motor glider is in fact a glider and can use the wind and the thermals to sustain flight. That being said the cost of operation for electric powered aircraft such as ours we believe will be very low. The actual cost of electricity less than a few dollars per hour of operating time. Cost of batteries will continue to decrease as the technology changes and the manufacturing capability improves. The cost of motors we anticipate will prorate at a cost of less than one dollar per flight hour.

I encourage you participate and help in our endeavor to push forward this concept of electric powered aircraft. We believe that we are developing an aircraft that will be good for the environment, promote aviation from the ground up, improve the accessibility of flight, and will be laying the groundwork for the next generation of aircraft.

About Carol Carpenter

About Carol Carpenter

CFO Rainbow Aviation and Adventure Aircraft

Education:

Graduate,  NADA Dealer Academy
Graduate,  California State University, Chico
California Teaching Credential

FAA Certificates:


Private Pilot
Ground Instructor
FAA Sport Pilot Instructor
Light Sport Repairman Maintenance (Airplane, Weightshift, Powered Parachute, Glider)

Experience:

2000- Present Owner: Rainbow Aviation Services, Fixed Base Operator, Corning, CA
2005- Present: Administrator Lightsport Repairman Courses
2010- Present Owner: Adventure Aircraft Inc., Corning, CA

Related Experience

FAA Safety Team Representative
ASTM Standards Voting Member
Freelance Aviation Magazine Columnist
Light Sport Subject Matter Expert
Rotax Certified Instructor
Aviation Expert Witness
Aviation Speaker
2003 Co-author: A Professional Approach to Ultralights
2005 Co-author: Sport Pilot Airplane: A Complete Guide
2015 Co-author: Technically Speaking (column in Sport Aviation/Experimenter)

Special Qualifications:

Winner of the 2006: The John Moody Award,
Light Aviation's highest and most prestigious award.


About Brian Carpenter

About Brian Carpenter

CEO Rainbow Aviation and Adventure Aircraft

Education:

76-80 US Navy Aviation Maintenance Technician
1980-1982 Helena Vocational Training  Institute,  HelenaMontana  Graduated and Certified Airframe and Powerplant Technician

FAA Certificates:

1979 Private Pilot
1982 Airframe and Powerplant Rating
1985 Inspection Authorization
1993 Commercial Rating
1994 Instrument Rating
1995 Certified Flight Instructor
1996 CFI Instrument Rating
2005  FAA Designated Airworthiness Representative
2005  FAA Designated Sport Pilot Examiner
2005 FAA Designated Sport Pilot Instructor Examiner
2006 Light Sport Repairman Maintenance Rating (Airplane,Weightshift, PoweredParachute, Glider)

Experience:

1976-1980 US Navy AMS-2
1982-1991 Aero Union Corporation, Chico, CA
1983- 1985  Aero Union Lead Mechanic
1985-1987  Aero Union Chief Inspector
1987-1990  Aero Union Maintenance Manager
1990-1991 Aero Union Director of Maintenance
1988-1990 Co-owner: Blue Max Enterprises Orland, CA
1991- Present Owner: Rainbow Aviation Services, Fixed Base Operator, Corning, CA
2010- Present Owner: Adventure Aircraft, Corning, CA

Related Experience:

EAA Technical Counselor
EAA Flight Advisor
Built over 34 aircraft
Aircraft Designer
Experimental Aircraft Test Pilot
Expert featured on EAA Homebuilder Tips 100+ videos
Rotax Certified Instructor
Aviation Expert Witness
Aviation Speaker
2003 Co-author: A Professional Approach to Ultralights
2005 Co-author: Sport Pilot Airplane: A Complete Guide
2015 Co-author: Technically Speaking (Column in Sport Aviation/Experimenter)

Special Qualifications:

Winner of the 2006: The John Moody Award,
Light Aviation's highest and most prestigious award.


January 2015 Progress Blog

January 2015 Progress Blog Archive





1-22 Rudder Assembly Manual
1-21 Rudder Assembly Overview Video
1-20 Covering the Rudder Time Lapse Video
1-19 Finish Coats on the rudder assembly
1-18 Fabric Covering on Rudder Assembly
1-17 Low Drag Rudder Assembly Video
1-15 Rudder Spar Assembly Video
1-14 Rudder Assembly Drawings
1-13 E-Drawings 3D Download Availible for Download
1-12 Completion of (LD) Rudder Assembly
1-10 LD Rudder Design Option
1-8 GT-500 Ventral Fin Installation
1-4 GT-500 Flight Test
1-2 Fuselage Boom Kit Manufacturing
1-1 CNC Press Brake Repair
12-31 CNC Machining Fuselage Boom Sheet Metal
12-30 Video Seat to Landing Gear Box
12-29 Passenger Rudder pedal Support Tube Video
12-27 Brake Mount Tube Video
12-26 Building The EMG-6 New Episode
12-22 GT-500 "Tow Plane" Test Flight